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Blogs: The evolution
Sometime in 1971 - Stanford's Les Earnest creates the "finger" protocol.

December 1977 - The finger protocol becomes an official standard.

January 1994 - Swarthmore student Justin Hall begins compiling lists of links at his site, links.net, and continues adding to the site for 11 years.

January 1995 - Early online diarist Carolyn Burke publishes her first entry for Carolyn's Diary.

April 1997 - Dave Winer launches Scripting News, which he calls the longest-running Web log currently on the Internet.

September 1997 - Slashdot begins publishing "News for Nerds."

December 1997 - Jorn Barger's RobotWisdom.com site apparently becomes the first to call itself a Web log.

Sometime in 1999
  • Brad Fitzpatrick launches Livejournal, which he calls his "accidental success."
  • Peter Merholz of Peterme.com declares he has decided "to pronounce the word 'weblog' as 'wee-blog.' Or 'blog' for short."
  • The word "blog" first appears in print, according to dictionary publisher Merriam-Webster.
August 1999 - Three friends who founded a San Francisco start-up called Pyra Labs create a tool called Blogger "more or less on a whim."

January 2001 - First crop of blogs nominated for the "Bloggies" award.

October 2001 - First version of Movable Type content management software becomes available.

February 2003 - Google acquires Pyra and its Blogger software.

May 2003 - First official version of WordPress open-source blogging software released for download.

October 2003 - Six Apart releases first version of its Typepad blogging service.

January 2004 - Boston-based Steve Garfield launches his video blog, considered one of the first such "vlogs."

October 2005 - VeriSign buys Dave Winer's Weblogs.com. Around the same time, AOL snaps up blog publisher Weblogs Inc.

February 2006 - Veteran blogger Jason Kottke abandons his yearlong attempt to live off of micropayments through his blog.

January 2007 - Members of the Media Bloggers Association are among the first bloggers to receive press credentials from a federal court.

February 2007 - Freelance video blogger Josh Wolf becomes the longest-serving journalist behind bars in U.S. history, on contempt charges.
Excerpt from CNet Asia. Read the rest of the article here.

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Migration Complete...

If you recall, sometime ago, I was toying with the idea of migrating to the wordpress platform. Today, that idea becomes a reality. The migration to wordpress is complete and all posts from today onwards will be at http://anakbrunei.org Do bear with me for the next couple of weeks while I figure out the ins and outs of wordpress hehe.

This site will remain visible for archive purposes. Thank you and see you over at the new pad!

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The House That Jack Built...

I really enjoyed reading Jack's post on Brunei businesses going bust. Absolutely agree that its not all gloom and doom and its just a matter of time before the economy starts pumping again with all those projects slated for the 9th RKN.

My only concern is this, what do we do before then? Aside from jostling for position with arms (and mouths) wide-open, ready for the giant JPKE to award those "mega-projects"?

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In return, they would get a safe, tax-free, and clean environment to bring up their families.

Sweet...